A large cemetery (about 4 acres) with over 200 gravestones. There are some interesting old gravestones in the old section and some novel statuary in the new part.

The Putnam Graveyards site has this to say about this cemetery:

The cemetery was incorporated May 4, 1853 as Carmel Valley Burial Ground Association (now defunct). A meeting was held at the home of William M. Hadden. Fourteen trustees were elected, eleven of which are buried in Tompkins Corners Cemetery: Barthalemew Tompkins, Isaac Hulse, Hiram Adams, Isaac S. Austin, William Hadden, Robert Barker, Ebaneser Lockwood, Daninel Lockwood, John Hulse, Titus Sackrider, Samual Christian. The following trustees are buried elsewhere: Ira Conklin, Moses Hadden, Norman Travis.

The cemetery name was later changed to Peekskill Hollow Cemetery, and then again to Tompkins Corners Cemetery. “Carmel Valley” was a stretch of land on the east side of the creek through Peekskill Hollow. It was formerly in the Town of Carmel, and transferred to Putnam Valley in 1861 by request of its residents; see Pelletreau, p. 732.

The cemetery is in two sections. The old section is to the right side of the car path that goes through to the back. The new section is to the left. This section is still used for burials. Many of the stones in the old section were down, broken, or hard to read, though beginning in 2009 efforts have begun to conserve the old stones (through an anonymous grant).

Carmel Valley, a stretch of land on the east side of the creek through Peekskill Hollow, was formerly in the Town of Carmel, and transferred to Putnam Valley in 1861 by request of its residents; see Pelletreau, p. 732. In that connection, Carmel Valley Cemetery is in the Town of Putnam Valley, on the east side of Peekskill Hollow Road, and now known as the Peekskill Hollow Cemetery.


The inscription reads:

How blest is my husband, bereft
Of all that could burden his mind;
How easy the soul that has left
This wearisome body behind.
This earth is affected no more
With sickness, or shaken with pain;
The war in the members is o’er
And never shall vex him again
This languishing head is at rest;
Its thinking and aching are o’er
This quiet, immovable breast
Is heaved by affliction no more




Leave a Reply