New Year in Paris 2: Van Gogh Exhibition


While we were in Paris my wife was keen to see the the new digital exhibition in the Atelier des Lumières. So off we went. According to the exhibition’s web site:

The exhibition immerses visitors in the paintings of Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890), a genius who was not recognised during his lifetime and who transformed painting. Projected on all the surface of the Atelier, this new visual and musical production retraces the intense life of the artist, who, during the last ten years of his life, painted more than 2,000 pictures, which are now in collections around the world.

The exhibition explores van Gogh’s numerous works, which radically evolved over the years, from The Potato Eaters (1885), Sunflowers (1888) and Starry Night (1889) to Bedroom at Arles (1889). The Atelier des Lumières highlights the Dutch painter’s expressive and powerful brushstrokes and is illuminated by the bold colours of his unique paintings. Warm hues give way to sombre colours. The immersive exhibition evokes van Gogh’s highly emotional, chaotic, and poetic inner world and highlights the constant interplay of light and shade.

The thematic itinerary retraces stages of the artist’s life, and his sojourns in Neunen, Arles, Paris, Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, and Auvers-sur-Oise. Visitors are transported into the heart of his works, from his early to mature years, and from his sunny landscapes and nightscapes to his portraits and still lives.

This is complemented by a new educational device inside the tank located in the centre of the Atelier: a selection of van Gogh’s famous paintings are represented in their entirety and accompanied by commentaries about his oeuvre and the museum in which it is exhibited.

The visual and musical work produced by Culturespaces and directed by Gianfranco Iannuzzi, Renato Gatto, and Massimiliano Siccardi, highlights the chromatic richness of his palette, as well as the potency of his drawings and his use of impasto.










Taken with a Sony RX100 M3.

Hudson River Museum

According to its website:

The Hudson River Museum, [is] a preeminent cultural institution in Westchester County and the New York metropolitan area. Situated on the banks of the Hudson River in Yonkers, New York, the HRM’s mission is to engage, inspire, and connect diverse communities through the power of the arts, sciences, and history.

The Museum offers engaging experiences for every age and interest. Tour the permanent collection and dynamic exhibitions of American art that range from nineteenth-century Hudson River School paintings to contemporary art installations; and explore Gilded Age decorative arts in the period rooms of our historic home, Glenview, built in 1877, which is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Excited by science and astronomy? Find out about the mysteries and discoveries of the cosmos in our state-of-the-art Planetarium—the only public planetarium in Westchester County. Learn all about the Hudson River in Hudson Riverama, a hands-on, environmental teaching gallery that explores the history and ecosystem of this majestic river.






Taken with a Sony RX100 M3

A Visit to Mount Gulian – Baron Von Steuben

These weekly excursions focus on visits to Revolutionary War Sites, and this gentleman was our reason for visiting Mount Gulian.

In this badly faded painting we see Friedrich Wilhelm August Heinrich Ferdinand Steuben (born Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben), a former Prussian officer who served as Inspector General and a Major General of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. He taught the army the essentials of military drills, tactics, and discipline. He served as Washington’s chief of staff in the final years of the war. His “Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States” served as the standard US drill manual until the war of 1812. Von Steuben made Mount Gulian his headquarters from 1783-1784.

Taken with a Sony RX-100 M3.