Another new bird

This time a Pileated Woodpecker. Seen in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery.

Interesting Facts. According to TheCornellLab:

The Pileated Woodpecker digs characteristically rectangular holes in trees to find ants. These excavations can be so broad and deep that they can cause small trees to break in half.

The feeding excavations of a Pileated Woodpecker are so extensive that they often attract other birds. Other woodpeckers, as well as House Wrens, may come and feed there.

The Pileated Woodpecker prefers large trees for nesting. In young forests, it will use any large trees remaining from before the forest was cut. Because these trees are larger than the rest of the forest, they present a lightning hazard to the nesting birds.

A Pileated Woodpecker pair stays together on its territory all year round. It will defend the territory in all seasons, but will tolerate new arrivals during the winter.

The oldest known Pileated Woodpecker was a male, and at least 12 years, 11 months old when he was recaptured and r-ereleased during banding operations in Maryland.

Taken with an Olympus OM-D EM-10 and Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42 f3.5-4.6 II

On the River at Croton Landing – Abandoned Jetty

There’s something about the pictures in this series that makes me very sad. Treasured things lost and washed up on beaches possibly remote from where they were last in the hands of people who treasured them.

In the dialogue Cratylus, Plato refers to a saying of Heraclitus’s that has become famous:

“Heraclitus, I believe, says that all things pass and nothing stays, and comparing things to the flow of a river, he says you could not step twice into the same river.”

That’s certainly true, but I wish it were not.

Taken with an Olympus OM-D EM-10 and Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42 f3.5-4.6 II

On the River at Croton Landing – Stuff on the beach

Flotsam? Jetsam? I’m not sure what the distinction is. Nor do I know whether of not and of these objects fall into either category. To me it’s all just stuff on the beach.

I liked the color contrast between the dark ribbon-like material (I find myself wondering what it is) and the bright orange color of the piece of driftwood. I also liked the textures: the black stuff is almost (but not quite) smooth and shiny, while the driftwood is rough. An then there’s the textures of smooth stones, and the rougher looking sand.

Taken with an Olympus OM-D EM-10 and Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42 f3.5-4.6 II

On the River at Croton Landing – Lost Beach Ball

Or is it a balloon? Whichever it is I’m sure some child was very sorry to lose it. If it’s a balloon might it have started out at a birthday party or some such event miles inland eventually being blown over to its present resting place. Was it even lost at Croton Landing? Or did it end up in the river, maybe miles away and then wash down (or maybe up since the Hudson is tidal) and then finally come ashore here?

Taken with an Olympus OM-D EM-10 and Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42 f3.5-4.6 II